Bordeaux

This fountain was dyed pink in honor of breast cancer awareness. I think it was done a little too red.

This fountain was dyed pink in honor of breast cancer awareness. I think it was done a little too red.

My second day in Bordeaux was spent touring the city. Unfortunately, it was a rainy day with a few moments of torrential downpour. But it was nothing a cheaply purchased H&M umbrella wouldn’t fix. Also, apparently a lot of churches and museums are closed on Mondays or have odd hours. But at least with all this walking between monuments and looking for something that was open, we saw a lot of the city.

Entryway to one of the gardens in Bordeaux.

Entryway to one of the gardens in Bordeaux.

Above is the Jardin Botanique that we found after being turned away from the modern art museum. They were having some sort of virtual reality conference that the public was not welcome to. I should have said “Do you know how I am???” because I always want to, but I did not take that opportunity.

The cemeteries never close. Except at night, to keep potential zombies in.

The cemeteries never close. Except at night, to keep potential zombies in.

We also went to this cemetery after the church across the street was closed. Some guy was yelling angrily at the cemetery guard, about what, I couldn’t tell. But it was full of rage. The cemetery guard jumped into his golf cart and sped down the tree lined avenue while the angry man watched, waiting for something. I really wish I could have understood what he was angry about. Although that wasn’t the strangest thing we saw that day. There was also a street of antique stores, and one we went into had a snake preserved in a jar and all manner of creepy portraits of elderly women. However, all of that was topped the next night by the scary guy at the carnival who was wearing a trench coat, shoes made from plastic and rubber bands, and was leering and yelling at people.

Cleaning years of grime off the cathedral.

Cleaning years of grime off the cathedral.

La Cathédrale Saint-André was open, so we got to see its gothic splendor. As you can tell from the picture, it is currently being cleaned. This was true of almost every church in the city. But what was odd is it looked like they’d gone around to each church and cleaned one section of the inside and the outside as examples of the appearance after cleaning. This seems like a good idea, until you think about all the scaffolding and tools that had to be set up and moved around.

Bridge across the Gironde river.

Bridge across the Gironde river. Oh, I mean navigable estuary. Thanks, wikipedia.

Technically, I had been to Bordeaux before when I was 8 months old. As much as I appreciate this early travel opportunity, I remember nothing. But I have seen pictures and while walking around Bordeaux, some things looked oddly familiar. Like the above bridge, which I feel like I’ve seen in a slightly faded picture in a photo album.

La grosse cloche (big clock). Can you tell its been raining?

La grosse cloche (big bell). Can you tell it's been raining?

That night in Bordeaux me and Randall went to another assistant’s house where she is staying. This mostly entailed drinking wine and petting the assistant’s host’s cat. I noticed that the Bordeaux assistants are a lot more low key than the Grenoble assistants. I feel like everyone I’ve met in the Grenoble academy has a really strong personality and character and the Bordeaux assistants are more mellow. I’m not saying this is good or bad, just an observation.

One more day of Bordeaux to cover. It includes an exciting visit to an UNESCO heritage site, a carnival, and Bordeaux at night. And very tired feet. I will be surprised if all my shoes make it back alive to the states. Today, I took a trip to Orange and I noticed that the soles are detaching from my tennis shoes. Not already!

2 thoughts on “Bordeaux

  1. Tim says:

    I tried the “Do you know who I am?” question at a Halloween party. It didn’t work.

  2. Allie says:

    Too bad. Maybe if you had been wearing a monocle it would have been more convincing.

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